M33 - Triangulum Galaxy

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ST-4000XCM, 2400s total exposure 9/13/12 Lake San Antonio, CA


At a distance of 3 million light years, M33 is one of the nearest galaxies, about the same distance as Andromeda. It is, in my opinion, the most spectacular of all the galaxies for imaging, since it is possible to resolve a large number of individual stars and nebulae. There are globular clusters in the image as well, though it is not obvious how to distinguish them from stars. The brightest emission nebula, appearing at about the 4:30 position relative to the center, is NGC 604.





M33 - Triangulum Galaxy

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Starshoot DSCI, 97 exposures, 10s each 9/26/08 Lake San Antonio, CA


Like the Andromeda Galaxy, this galaxy is much too large to fit inside the field of view, but it is much more challenging bceause of its low surface brightness. However, there is a much better chance to see individual stars, clusters, and nebulas. This image just shows the central portion. A much longer exposure is needed to really show all of the features in this galaxy.





NGC 604 in M33

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Starshoot DSCI, 60 exposures, 10s each 9/26/08 Lake San Antonio, CA


This is another image of the Triangulum Galaxy, but shifted to the upper-left to show the most prominent nebula in this galaxy, NGC 604. It does not have the red color I expected from photographs I have seen. I'm not sure why, but I notice it also appears smaller than what I saw in some photographs, so perhaps we are seeing only the brightest core of the nebula due to insufficient exposure.